Exploring the Nature and Consequences of Overreach in Psychology (Edwin E. Gantt & Richard N. Williams) Book Review & Summary

AMZN link

This slim, engaging, and valuable book belongs in the book series, Advances in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, edited by Brent D. Slife. It consists of eight chapters by various authors, in addition to a foreword by the series Editor, a preface by Daniel Robinson, and the Editors’ Introduction. In this review, I shall provide brief summaries of the eight chapters and point out why the book is an important contribution.

Chapter 1 (by Daniel N. Robinson) is concerned with the relationship between scientific claims and phenomena of the everyday life. The ability to make scientific claims depends on everyday life…


What is the relationship between an artist and her audience? What are the guiding principles, if any, for such a relationship? And what types of outcome can we expect to arise from that relationship? In “Charlie Parker Plays Bossa Nova,” Murakami explores these questions with an emphasis on a kind of artist-audience relationship that is deeply personal and borders on a relation among co-creators. It would be helpful to first discuss the opposite kind of relationship, the type from which Murakami tries to move away. …


Photograph by Nathan Bajar (link)

Before getting naked, before revealing ourselves and becoming vulnerable, we might try to verbally prepare the other for what they are about to see. “I have scar on my chest,” one might say; or, “I have a birthmark on my leg.” What do these statements do? They ensure that the attention of the other person — the beloved, perhaps — is oriented to our imperfection. The other person might otherwise miss that imperfection, without our act of foregrounding, without our invitation to see. Do we announce our vulnerabilities to take an active role in relation to them? To get an…


The short story “Creme” is the first in the recently published Haruki Murakami collection, First Personal Singular (Ichininshō Tansū), translated to English by Philip Gabriel. The story’s title hints at the French expression crème de la crème, which refers to the very best part or the very best instance of something. We could, therefore, regard the story as an attempt at describing what is best in life. But this strategy only amplifies the strangeness of this story.

Let’s begin with a summary. A narrator is telling a friend a story from his past, from when he was a young man…


Review of Piercing the Cloud: Encountering the Real Me by Jaime Pineda. BookBaby 2020

Piercing the Cloud: Encountering the Real Me is the autobiography of Jaime A. Pineda (b. 1953), professor emeritus of cognitive neuroscience at University of California, San Diego. The book begins with Pineda’s recollection of his childhood memories in Honduras and continues up to the present day. We read about his family, his move to the United States as a young boy, the strict discipline he acquired from his grandmother, his time in the United States Air Force, his travels in Europe, his academic life as a student and then as a professor, his persistent concerns with identity, his two marriages…


George Saunders’ book, A Swim in a Pond in the Rain: In Which Four Russians Give a Masterclass on Writing, Reading, and Life, contains seven short stories with Saunders’ commentary on each. Out of the seven stories, three are by Anton Chekov, two by Leo Tolstoy, and the others are by Ivan Turgenev and Nikolai Gogol. The book is based on a university course on nineteenth-century Russian short stories that Saunders has been teaching for twenty years.

Comparing the number of stories included in the book to the thirty he usually assigns to his students, Saunders draws our attention —…

Davood Gozli

Davood Gozli is assistant professor of psychology at the University of Macau.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store